High North

Here you can find all employees in NIKU, click on the arrow to sort by category and click on the name for more information.

    Last name     First name     Position     Department     City     Phone     Mobile
BarlindhaugStineResearcher / archaeologistHigh NorthTromsø77750420 48119930

Stine BarlindhaugResearcher / archaeologist

Phone: 77750420 Mobile: 48119930

Biography
Stine Barlindhaug is an archaeologist and researcher in the High North Department in Tromsø. She has worked at NIKU since 2001.

Barlindhaug's core competencies are in North Norwegian and Sami archaeology and cultural history, PGIS, remote sensing analysis, landscape analysis, impact analysis, and the recording and documentation of cultural monuments. Her current work primary focuses on methodological approaches to mapping and monitoring cultural heritage sites, and historic land use in the High North.

She previously worked in the cultural heritage management in Finnmark County, and has since headed and participated in a number of projects focused on North Norwegian and Sámi cultural history.

Barlindhaug holds a PhD from the Arctic University of Norway, UIT.

06.11.2014
EythórssonEinarSenior researcher/Social scientistHigh NorthTromsø77750444 40466831

Einar EythórssonSenior researcher/Social scientist

Phone: 77750444 Mobile: 40466831

Biography
Einar Eythórsson is a senior researcher at the High North Department in Tromsø. He has a Dr. Polit in planning and community studies from the University of Tromsø, and has worked as a researcher at NIKU since 2008. His research profile is: Economic adaptations, resource harvesting, land- and resource rights and traditional ecological knowledge in coastal Sami areas. Management systems for renewable natural resources and landscapes in the North Atlantic and the Arctic; fisheries and aquaculture; and wildlife management with focus on impact of wildfowl grazing on agricultural crops. Cross-disciplinary approaches to ecological change and ecosystem services.

He has experience as a project manager of several large research and analysis projects, such as Fjord Ecosystems – Sami Communities: Local Ecological Knowledge and Socio-Ecological History (NRC 2008-2011), and expert assessments on land use and traditional rights on previously state-owned land in Finnmark (Finnmark Commission 2009-2011). He is engaged in several multi-disciplinary research projects at the FRAM - High North Research Centre for Climate and the Environment, and has conducted impact assessments for interventions in Sami settlement areas.

Eythórsson has previously worked as a researcher at Finnmark College, the Norwegian Institute for Urban and Rural Research (NIBR), the Northern Research Institute and Tromsø University Museum.


06.11.2014
HesjedalAndersResearcher / archaeologistHigh NorthTromsø7775044397185394

Anders HesjedalResearcher / archaeologist

Phone: 77750443Mobile: 97185394

Biography
Anders Hesjedal is a researcher at the High North Department. He holds a dr.art. in archaeology from UiT – the Arctic University of Norway.

Hesjedal`s core competencies are in North Norwegian archaeology and cultural history, recording and documentation of cultural monuments. More recently he has investigated modern material culture. The point of departure has been a comparative approach toward cultural monuments in Norway from the Second World War and the Cold War, related to the more overall European case.

Hesjedal has previously worked as a researcher at UiT – the Arctic University of Norway and as a project manager for Troms County Council.  He has managed and participated in several projects focused on Norwegian and Arctic prehistory and history. 

26.11.2015
HolmgaardSanne BechHigh NorthTromsø7775044640300339

Sanne Bech Holmgaard

Phone: 77750446Mobile: 40300339

Biography
Sanne Bech Holmgaard is a social anthropologist at the High North Department. She has worked at NIKU since 2014. Her work focuses mainly on impact assessments, social and cultural analysis and project management within the main focus areas of the High North Department.

Holmgaard’s primary research interests are traditional knowledge, indigenous peoples and minorities, climate change and social change in addition to postcolonial processes in a High North perspective.

Holmgaard has previously worked at UiT – the Arctic University of Norway and has experience with teaching, academic development and administration.  She has a BA in anthropology from the University of Copenhagen and a MA in social anthropology from UiT – the Arctic University of Norway.

26.11.2015
MyrvollElin RoseHead of department / researcher / archaeologistHigh NorthTromsø7775042495062570

Elin Rose MyrvollHead of department / researcher / archaeologist

Phone: 77750424Mobile: 95062570

Biography
Elin Rose Myrvoll is the Head of the High North Department in Tromsø, and has worked for NIKU since 1999.

Myrvoll's main areas of expertise are in northern Norwegian and Sami archaeology and cultural history, GIS (geographic information systems), landscape analyses, impact assessments, and the recording and documentation of cultural monuments.

Myrvoll previously worked in cultural heritage management in Finnmark county, and spent two years at the Várjjat Sámi Museum/Nesseby muncipality. She has managed and participated in several projects focused on northern Norwegian and Sami cultural history.

Myrvoll holds a PhD from the University of Tromsø.

NæssMarius WargResearcher / Social anthropologistHigh NorthTromsø77 75 04 4190721907

Marius Warg NæssResearcher / Social anthropologist

Phone: 77 75 04 41Mobile: 90721907

Biography
Marius Warg Næss is a researcher at the High North Department. He has a PhD in anthropology from UiT – the Arctic University of Norway.

He works interdisciplinary at the intersection of social science and ecology. His primary focus is on natural resources use and how developing adaptive management systems require the integration of knowledge from the social and natural sciences. He has broad experience working both quantitatively and qualitatively with particular focus on Saami reindeer husbandry and nomadic pastoralists in Tibet. Specifically, he has been concerned with understanding how: (1) labour investment and cooperation influence pastoral production; (2) pastoral decision-making affects herd dynamics; and (3) nomadic pastoralists manage environmental risk.

More recently, he has been using a comparative approach to investigate: (1) the rationale and consequences of governmental management policies; (2) the effects of climate change; and (3) how governmental management policies may both exacerbate the negative effects of climate change and transform traditional social institutions.

Key qualifications:
High North, Tibet, nomadic pastoralism, reindeer husbandry, Tibetan pastoralism, risk management, adaptation, labour and production, mobility/land use, cooperation and conflict, game theory, human ecology, human behavioural ecology, climate change, policy, social organisation, quantitative and qualitative method, interdisciplinary approaches, traditional knowledge, theoretical modelling.

Næss has previously worked as a postdoctoral fellow/researcher at the Centre for International Climate and Environmental Research – Oslo.

19.03.2015
RavnaZoiaPhD studentHigh NorthTromsø77750445

Zoia RavnaPhD student

Phone: 77750445Mobile:

Biography
Zoia Vylka Ravna, has an MA in visual anthropology and is a doctoral student in the research project “Human-Animal Relations Under Climate Change in Northern Eurasia (HUMANOR)”.

 
The topic of her research is to examine the processes and channels for transmission of traditional knowledge from mothers to children in Nenets societies. To follow the regulatory requirements of the modern Russian education system, Nenets children have to stay for nine months of the year at a boarding school. The available time and processes for learning traditional knowledge are as a result shortened to only three summer months. It is therefore important to find out what kind of knowledge they manage to possess and acquire, and if this short time is enough to learn the knowledge and skills needed in order to succeed as a reindeer herder and nomad in the challenging arctic environment. Another important focus of this investigation is to see if girls in particular, are coming back to live on the tundra after twelve years away.

26.11.2015
ThomasMatthewResearcjer/ AnthropologistHigh NorthTromsø7775016448125389

Matthew ThomasResearcjer/ Anthropologist

Phone: 77750164Mobile: 48125389

Biography
Matthew Thomas is an anthropologist whose work involves a combination of social science, ecology and evolutionary biology.

As a researcher for NIKU and the Norwegian Institute for Nature Research (NINA), he is investigating how mobility, kinship, reciprocity, reputation, social conventions and traditional knowledge underpin cooperation among Saami reindeer herders. He is also exploring how Saami social organisation is being affected by shifting land use rights and climate change.

Matthew has a PhD in anthropology from University College London.

ThuestadAlmaArchaeologistHigh NorthTromsø77750440 
Archaeologist

Alma ThuestadArchaeologist

Phone: 77750440 Mobile:

Biography

Alma Elizabeth Thuestad is an archaeologist at the High North Department and has been with NIKU since 2005.

Thuestad’s core expertise is within North Norwegian and Sami archeology and cultural history, GIS (Geographic Information Systems) and remote sensing. Thuestad works with archaeological applications of GIS and remote sensing. Her current work primarily focuses on methodological approaches to mapping and monitoring cultural heritage sites, and historic land use in the High North. Other assignments include spatial planning and environmental impact assessment.

Thuestad has a cand. philol degree from the University of Tromsø and has extensive experience from excavations and surveys in Northern Norway.


01.09.2014